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Over the years, we have collected valuable information and fun facts about the benefits and value an awning provides. We have even produced our own informaitonal video detailing the quality of our product.

Videos And Animation

HGTV’s Curb Appeal Episode featuring an Eclipse Awning

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Eclipse Awning Systems Product video / features, benefits and quality

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AWNINGS CAN HELP REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR ENERGY BILL

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Eclipse E-Zip Wind Speed Test

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Articles

Eclipse Shading Systems was selected to help in the construction of a very special home

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DON’T LET THE SUN KEEP YOU INSIDE…WITH THE PUSH OF A BUTTON, SHADY RELIEF IS AT HAND

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NEW STUDY PROVE AWNINGS CAN SAVE ON ENERGY COSTS FOR HOME OWNERS

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Don’t Let The Sun Keep You Inside.
With the push of a button, shady relief is at hand.

With dreams of lounging in the sun, you’ve invested thousands of dollars in your new deck or patio. But the sun is much hotter than you had expected, and with fears of skin cancer increasing every day, you find yourself spending more time indoors.

But don’t despair. You can enjoy your deck or patio–no matter the temperature–if you install a retractable fabric awning. With the push of a button, cool, shady relief is at hand.

Your personal comfort is just one of the benefits of a retractable awning. The shade from your awning can reduce heat gain inside your home by as much as 77 percent, lowering indoor temperatures by 15 degrees. Not only will you save on your energy bill, but you will also protect valuable draperies, carpet and furniture from fading.

“Most people add an awning to their homes for personal comfort so they can enjoy a deck or patio,” said John Dearden, managing partner of Eclipse Awning Systems, a leading national manufacturer. “The additional benefits–reduced energy costs and protecting home furnishings–are advantages that homeowners quickly appreciate just as much.”

There has never been a better time to consider a retractable awning. Improvements in materials and design innovations have made retractable awnings longer lasting and more flexible than ever before. Lateral arms, roller tubes, connecting components and all-weather performance fabrics, such as the Sunbrella brand, are designed for carefree service.

Anyone concerned about sun exposure will be glad to know that Sunbrella fabrics have been recognized by The Skin Cancer Foundation as offering significant levels of sun protection.

Motorization of retractable awnings and associated electronic controls contribute to carefree service. Wind sensors can automatically retract your awning to protect it from high winds, and sun sensors will cause the awning to extend when the sun comes out.

One of the most recent advances in retractable awnings is flexibility for just about any space. Through advanced engineering, an awning can be extended up to 16.5 feet from your home to cover an entire deck or patio. For smaller spaces, such as a town home, retractable awnings can be created that extend as much as 11.5 feet but are only 8 feet wide.

“Anyone considering a retractable awning should do their homework to be sure of getting a quality product,” Dearden said. “With the right materials and professional installation, a retractable awning adds comfort and value to your home.”

NEW STUDY PROVES AWNINGS CAN SAVE ON ENERGY COSTS FOR HOMEOWNERS

Awnings, an increasingly popular home improvement option, provide style, shade, curb appeal and an even greater benefit – reduced energy costs.

A new study has found that awnings can provide significant savings on cooling costs and on peak electrical demand by reducing solar gain through home windows. The study, Awnings in Residential Buildings: The Impact on Energy Use and Peak Demand, was conducted by the Center for Sustainable Building Research at the University of Minnesota.

The Professional Awning Manufacturers Association (PAMA) funded the study to determine if awnings are a viable means of reducing energy and air conditioner usage in the home. Most U.S. residential neighborhoods do not have a significant number of awnings, unlike Europe, where awnings are used to significantly reduce air-conditioning use in the summer. The study investigated the energy savings for single family homes and the reduction of energy use during peak periods.

In the first phase of the study, awning impacts were measured in seven U.S. cities across various climates, including, Minneapolis, Boston, Seattle, Albuquerque, Phoenix, St. Louis and Sacramento. The study revealed that in all cities for all window orientations tested, there are significant energy savings in cooling costs and peak electricity demand as a result of using window awnings. The range of energy saved varies, depending on the number of windows, types of glass in the windows and window orientation. Phase two is due for release in the near future, and will include additional cities.

Specifically, the study found that in Phoenix, Ariz., a warm climate, window awnings can reduce home cooling energy as much as 26 percent compared to a home with completely unshaded windows. In St. Louis, Mo., a mixed climate, awnings can reduce cooling energy as much as 23 percent. Similarly, in Boston, Mass., a cold climate, awnings can reduce the need for cooling energy as much as 33 percent.

“Depending on the region a home is in, awnings can save home owners potentially several hundred dollars annually, but energy savings of this degree are valuable beyond reducing homeowner’s expenses,” said Michelle Sahlin, Managing Director of PAMA. “When numerous homeowners reduce their need for energy, there is less demand for energy at the times of peak usage, resulting in overall savings to utility companies and the public from a decreased need to supply generating capacity.”

Researchers used a specialized computer program to investigate variables in conjunction with a standard awning with sides. The variables included geographic location, window orientation and exposure, winter and summer usage, and window type. For more information about the study, contact Michelle Sahlin at mesahlin@ifai.com.